Tag Archives: psychics

Interview with Michelle Frost

Author of Elephant Songs

Michelle Frost has written an amazing book detailing her journey as a reluctant psychic. Elephant Songs is the autobiography of her life story from Africa to Scotland and from childhood brushes with spirits to a more mature spirituality. The book is engaging, honest, and very intriguing. Today she joins me to talk about the book and her experiences.  

Why did you decide to write an autobiography? How did it come about?

My mother was the first person to suggest that I write a book. She felt I should share my experiences, but every time I tried to write I’d start thinking about strangers actually reading my life and… I’d freeze up. Everything I wrote was stiff, deadly dull and boring. This book is very much owed to my internet friend, Richard Eldredge. He’s a rare thing – an open-minded sceptic. He’d constantly ask questions and I’d email back. By the time I’d finished answering all his questions I had 42 emails about my life and my abilities. They became the foundation of my book. 42 is the answer to “Life, the Universe and everything”, according to The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. How could I resist that cosmic joke?

Do you thinking growing up in Africa influenced your on-going spiritual life?

Definitely. Africa is steeped in mysticism and its people are far more aware of magic and the unknown. Things that would be laughed at in the West are still seen as perfectly normal in Africa. I grew up with first hand experiences of witchdoctor curses and cures as well as the legends of magical places and legendary beasts. Anything feels possible in Africa.

How important was it to your spiritual development to keep a dream journal?

I’d say that it helped my self-trust mostly. When I first started a dream journal my intention was to prove why my dreams came true. I was expecting to find a rational explanation, but instead all I proved was that I really was dreaming of things before they happened. Having that proof helped me come to terms with the fact I had psychic abilities. I’m a rational person at heart and simply trusting my intuition does not come easy for me. Having my journal to return to has enabled me to look back over decades and see patterns as well as reasons that I was completely clueless about at the time.

How did your hospital stay of 2005 affect your abilities?

It was the first of two events that changed my abilities. I woke up from surgery to find I could “see” and “hear” at a level I’d never had as an adult. I’d been able to see spirits as a very young child, but that faded quickly as I grew up. The surgery seemed to trigger some change. A friend of mine suggested that the anaesthetic and morphine acted on my brain in a similar manner to the hallucinogenic plants South American Shamans use.

By “see” and “hear” I mean a state of awareness that is more clear and real than imagination, but not literal seeing or hearing.

You had a spirit-guide who revealed himself over a long period. This experience was far from what is commonly reported. Can you tell us a little about that? What advise do you have for others whose experiences don’t match the textbook case?

My “spirit-guide” (we both know the label isn’t a perfect fit, but to say more would be a book spoiler) revealed himself after the second major event to change my abilities. I was writing my second book, Wisdoms of the Light (sequel to First Light), in 2013. Writing that book changed me. It was an intense experience and I wasn’t alone in feeling that. A psychic friend of mine offered to be an extra proof reader. When he finished reading through the first draft, he sent me a message his spirit-guide dictated for me:

You have grown exponentially of late and it is because of the book, because of the creative process employed with the book and the unusual way in which you created characters from self, from “ALL”, from else-where’s lifetimes, to both create a fascinating narrative and also a healing, consciousness raising/expanding experience for you.

It was about a week after I finished that first draft that I HEARD my spirit-guide speak for the first time. HEARD because he was loud, clear and very real. A life-changing moment I will never forget.

I can’t comment much on “what is commonly reported” since I haven’t read any books about other people’s experiences with spirit-guides. My advice to others would be to trust themselves and their “gut feeling” over anything they read or are taught/told. We are all unique and nothing works for everyone. If something feels wrong – trust that it is wrong for you and move on. Same with what feels right. I’d have saved myself a lot of stress and grief if I’d relied on my gut and intuition more than my intellect.

Your spirit-guide repeatedly tells you to “think from the heart, not the head.” What does he mean by this?

I can start by saying what he doesn’t mean, this isn’t about connecting to your emotions.

Let’s start with some basics. We tend to use the heart as a symbol of love and emotion, just as we use the brain to symbolise logic and intellectual deduction. I’d say that modern humans have become exceptionally “head bound”. We revere the brain and all things related to it: book learning, diplomas in knowing stuff, facts and figures. And as a result, we often see emotions as being unstable and more of a weakness than a strength.

My spirit-guide explained that there has to be balance between the two for any human to be completely healthy and productive, but this “thinking from the heart” is something more than that. When he says this, he points or presses his hand on a spot a few inches below my throat; a place roughly half way between heart and brain. He says this area is where we hold the energy he describes as “the higher heart energy”. It’s the place from where we connect to “All” – our higher self, God and/or the Cosmos. Here is where we experience those feelings we call intuition or genius; those moments when we simply KNOW something instantly without any need to mull it over in our brains or run it through our emotional heart. 

He constantly nags me about this higher heart thinking. I’m still struggling with this. I’ll have the moment of instantly knowing (higher heart intuition), but then my brain starts asking questions and my emotions run off in all directions like a flock of hysterical sheep.

Were you ever concerned that writing a book as deeply personal as this, might open you to ridicule? Has there been any negative pushback? What about support from surprising places?

I’ve worried mostly about accidentally hurting or offending anyone, since this is a book about my life where I do talk about my experiences and people I know, friends and family. Ridicule doesn’t worry me as much. I was teased for being skinny and sickly as a kid, laughed at for being overweight as a suddenly healthy teen and ridiculed for all sorts of things (politics, religion, nationality, gender, etc.) as an adult. I’m fairly immune at this stage. My main concern was to keep it truthful without causing harm to others.

So far, I’ve not had any negative pushback. As for support in surprising places… I’ve had a few people contact me to say thank you for writing the book. They’ve all been people who can relate as they’ve had similar experiences. That’s been awesome.

In a time when it appears more and more of us are “waking up,” how important is it that stories like yours find their way into the world?

This is why I agreed to publish in the first place, because people like my mom and friends said, “this is needed.” I know dozens of people who have psychic abilities or have had esoteric/spiritual experiences and been too afraid to admit that fact for most of their lives. That, to me, is a tragic waste of human potential.

Thanks for being here today and sharing your journey! For more about Michelle Frost and her work, check out the links below.

Blog: http://crows-feet.blogspot.com/

GoodReads: http://goo.gl/swYHsB

Amazon: http://goo.gl/KKGKkD

Barnes & Noble: http://goo.gl/QH9tQe

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THE POWER OF PREMONITIONS by Larry Dossey, MD

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Larry Dossey has written a fascinating book about premonitions, those events that forewarn of a possible future. Dossey blurs the line a bit by including intuition as well. Many people have these experiences and most of us are uncertain as to what to do about them. The book is full of examples including those of SIDS parents who often know something is not right, the high vacancy rates on the doomed planes of 9/11, and the use of psychics to predict the stock market (yes, it can be done- to a point). Arguments are presented that these abilities are natural and part of evolutionary survival. Some may be more prone to them and some may handle them better than others. So who is more likely to glimpse a possible future? Can premonitions be cultivated?

Artwork by Genia1016

Artwork by Genia1016

 

Dossey outlines some factors that may give some an edge to receiving premonitions or intuitions. Although more research is needed to establish the relevance of each of these, it is easy to see why they correlate. Here is the list, although other things could be added (for example- does the culture of the individual support premonitions, psi).

  1. Absorption- the ability to lose oneself in an activity, to be comfortable with imagination & fantasy
  1. Belief in the transcendent- not limited to the here & now
  1. Acknowledgement of intuition- open to the idea of spontaneous, innate knowing
  1. Comfortable with disorder- the ability to go with the flow and let go of control
  1. Seeking meaning- looking for underlying symbols and patterns
  1. Worldview- the world is a benevolent place
  1. Cultivation of a discipline which supports being present- these include meditation, prayer, being in silence, being in nature, etc.

Dossey believes premonitions can be cultivated, but also acknowledges that there are people who probably would not be stable enough to handle them. There’s a brief section and caution given about seeking psychiatric care. For someone who is having issues dealing with these types of experiences, it would probably be better to seek out a Jungian practitioner since their worldview is more open in regards to psi.

 

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Another question running through the book involves when we should pay attention to our dreams and intuitions. The nature of these phenomena is that of being incomplete- often lacking the details of who, what, when, and where. Dreams especially, use a symbolic language that is often difficult to decipher. So what to do? Some common sense guidelines may help here. The experiences to really pay attention to are those that have a noetic quality- a sense of knowing. Without understanding how, you simply know. Anytime a dream is especially vivid or downright extraordinary, take note. Pay attention when the dream or intuition is accompanied by physical symptoms. One story related in the book, concerns an OB/GYN who can feel in his body when a patient is in trouble, and by honoring this, he often is headed to the hospital before he gets the call. Watch for those instances when the experience is intrusive and insistent. Pay attention when death or illness is indicated even when specific details are lacking. Over time, people can develop a sense of what’s important. The Rhine Institute conducted a study of 433 premonition cases where a person attempted to intervene to prevent an incident. Intervention was about twice as successful as not, indicating the future may not be written in stone. Premonitions don’t reveal fate, but rather a possible future.

Artwork by Genia1016

Artwork by Genia1016

 

Here are a few teasers from the book:

The Arlington Institute (TAI) works with precognizant dreamers formerly with government intelligence services to prevent disaster.

The FBI won’t release travel records for plane occupancy on 9/11. Was plane travel down just on the crashed aircraft or across the board?

There is a positive correlation between creativity/artistic ability and psi ability.

High performing CEOs score high on random number generator tests indicating they’re highly intuitive (although they don’t see themselves as such).

In 2007, Harteis & Gruber found intuitive predictions of stock market development were better than rationally justified ones.

In 1982, psychic Beverly Jaegers outperformed 17 of 18 stockbrokers (but not all psychics are that good- don’t ask a psychic for a lottery number, they usually can’t do numbers).

The stock market as a collective, “punished” the company responsible for the Challenger disaster before any investigations were done.

Dean Radin’s presentiment research at IONS showed people react to images before a computer picks them.

Rupert Sheldrake has collected many stories of animals refusing to go with their owners to areas where accidents later occur.

After an accident, Harriet Tubman had dreams and visions. This ability allowed her to guide slaves on the Underground Railroad.

Remote viewers see emotional images more frequently and that may give us a clue as to why premonitions usually indicate nasty events.

For centuries (and even today), fisherman in Iceland use dreams to locate a catch.

Join me next time when I sit down for a conversation with astrologer Mama Maga of Karma2Dharma Astrology.

 

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