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SHAKING MEDICINE by Bradford Keeney

Shaking Medicine

Bradford Keeney’s book, Shaking Medicine, takes us into the heart of healing with ecstatic movement.  While the East and West delights in powerful, relaxing healing modalities of meditation and acupuncture, Keeney bravely asserts we are missing the other half of healing medicine- the shaking forms of arousal from Africa and other cultures.  Mostly absent from our culture are the healing techniques of The Shake and it’s time we got over our prejudice.  Keeney believes that it is only when we fully cycle through being hyper-aroused and then deeply relaxed, can we powerfully realign and evolve in a pattern consistent with holistic medicine.  Fifty years ago or so, meditation was new and seen as a fringe movement and now it is so accepted and commonplace, doctors recommend it.  Keeney predicts Shaking Medicine is coming west and it’s healing benefits will be open to all.  At first I wondered about that, but my latest foray into my local meetup groups, revealed that there is a group dedicated to ecstatic dance.

Of course, some of the hurdles for society to overcome are the immediate associations we have for those shaking.  Historically scholars (and the general public) have associated ecstatic movement with mental or neurological disease.  Some would even go so far as to say evil or satanic, but most of that is either blatant prejudice or cultural ignorance.  There is also a fear of being out of control that western cultures so value.  Conformity and predictability are pillars of our society, what would happen if everyone shook?  Would we….lose it?  And those still prevalent fears have led Keeney to call shaking The Last Great Taboo.

Photo by: Justin Hall

Photo by: Justin Hall

So what is shaking all about?  Simply put it’s an experience, a journey into the ecstatic state brought forth by trembling joy.  You tremble, quake, and shake losing control and entering into healing and transformation.  Like other mystical practices, you surrender to higher authority and wisdom.  For Keeney, it’s the thing most missing from our spiritual table in the West.  Cultures who practice it value it for its ability to renew and restore vitality.  It takes us into the unknown and connects us to life in all its forms.

Assembly of Quakers, London. Engraving.

Assembly of Quakers, London. Engraving.

This is a book I truly loved.  I knew nothing about the subject and enjoyed visiting the diverse cultures Keeney portrays.  Lest you think shaking is confined to the African continent, Keeney starts out with a tale about settlers in the Pacific Northwest and later the Quakers and Shakers all of whom participated in ecstatic movement in pursuit of spiritual growth.  Keeney has strong ties to the Kalahari bushmen earning the title of Heart of Spears, a title of respect acquired by learning and experiencing their shaking medicine.  Some of the other cultures explored in the fascinating book include the: Spiritual Baptists of St. Vincent (Caribbean), African American Church, Seiki Jutsu (Japan), and Hindu/Buddhist traditions (India).  The book comes with a CD and instructions to begin your own journey of discovery.  Highly recommended!

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INTERVIEW WITH AUTHOR EDWARD FAHEY

THE MOURNING AFTER by Edward Fahey

mourning after)

Seeking other writers who write on spiritual topics, I was drawn to Edward Fahey’s work. His recently released novel is a treasure and I want to share it with a larger community of bloggers and others who have gifted me with a very special audience. Edward has created a beautiful, mystical work using his own brand of poetic prose which captivates and delights. His writing excels for its descriptions, character building, and tone. Come; dig into the magic and mystery as we follow Denis, M, and Waters who will eventually discover who they truly are.

Here’s a brief synopsis of The Mourning After:

Nightmares of war and death from lost centuries torment a young boy with ever more devastating detail until he can’t separate fantasy from reality. Denis meets a child he calls M, who seems to know his dreams intimately. She asks him, “Do you … remember?” He grows into adulthood amid disturbing evidence that his fantasies have been ancient memories. He finds a decrepit cabin in the woods where they start coming real. Outside is a grave for one of his “imaginary” childhood playmates, Enoch. Someone has been tending a garden over it. Through life after life Denis and M have loved each other with increasing desperation. He keeps dying young; leaving her grieving into lonely old age. Enoch, always in the background, somehow holds the key to ending this cycle of suffering. Denis now searches for M, as she fights her own haunting mysteries back to him. He meets a quiet, mysterious man in the forest…. You will believe in reincarnation. Probably before the narrator can. You will know that broken relationships can be mended, and that tragedy can lead to triumph. But most of all you will fall in love. This is a tale for those who never quite fit in. It’s a story of passion, where that which can’t possibly be true weaves through wonders that can’t be denied, until love makes everything real.

In a world where death is but another beginning, you must trust in what you cannot believe.

Welcome Edward and thanks for being here.

Author Edward Fahey inside Merlin's Cave.

Author Edward Fahey inside Merlin’s Cave.

Thank you, Ellis. I feel like The Mourning After is my gentle-natured baby, so I love that she is touching the hearts and lives of so many readers. It’s like we are an intimate and growing family. I’m thrilled you’re now part of it.

I know this novel is a reflection of your own spiritual path and I wonder if you could share how the idea for the novel came into being and how it grew over time.

My mom, dad, and great-grandmother returned as ghosts. People in my family don’t always stay dead. I’ve had past life memories of being given as a small child to the church in medieval times, and of being burned at the stake as a high priest. Since childhood I’ve sensed lingering spirits in old homes and graves. So you might guess I rather naturally came by a certain curiosity about what lies beyond.

“The Mourning After” also grew out of a profound romance, including shared past life memories that totally changed me in my twenties. When it ended, a victim of loving beyond the stage of self-sacrifice, almost to that of soul-demolition, I knew we’d have to meet again in some future life, because we weren’t done loving each other.

I marinated in this conviction for years until “Mourning” was finally born.

I just returned from six months in Europe, touring powerful ancient centers of spirit, mysticism, and magic, along with ancient graveyards. Exploring other realms has been a lifelong passion of mine.

Photo by Daniel Case

Photo by Daniel Case

Throughout the book, you use extracts from The Mountain Journal. As a reader, I questioned whether these poems were specifically created for the book or if they were from your own journals collected over the years.

Great question. It was actually some of both. I’ve had readers tell me my characters are so alive they have dreamed about them. Well just imagine how they shove and nudge about through my own days and nights. When I finish writing one novel, I have to spend months letting that world dissolve before I can find an open  place in which to start building, or discovering, the next world.

But while they are alive, we eat, sleep, and dream together. When I watch trees fade into darkness, I see them through the eyes, spirit, and mood of whichever character is coming through me at that time.

For example, I heard a dog echoing through the woods one night. I live in the woods, and had heard that before, but this time I was sitting with Denis, a lonely, painfully sensitive, isolated soul who had lost everyone he’d ever loved. He was troubled by nightmares that could have been ghosts, could have been past life memories. So I feel it was he, more that I, who wrote:

      Dogs don’t echo in the city.   

Under a low, sodden moon,

one far distant and solitary beast

called out to a world that had turned away.

His plaintive baying haunted me,

echoing unanswered through the wooded hills.

His loneliness drew up into a soft little fist of tears inside my chest.

The evening was just gathering;

this poor empty creature would have a long time to cry uncomforted.

- Then I sensed forsaken spirits

wandering lost among the trees around me,

keeping silent company,

themselves uncherished and unanswered.

As these nightmares and mysteries gather ferocity, slashing at him, insisting he figure them out, he can feel something big, maybe even fatal, coming at him. So when I listened to the winds as he was went this, it was as if it was he who was listening: 

Far off I heard ominous winds gathering force,

churning trees with massing ferocity;

while around me

all things held and were still.

Except for the anticipation.

As I looked out on cold grey day as he suffered, I shared his mood:

     Outside the clouding windows,

a few weary leaves

shivered off their last dying hopes

as fragile wood fingers danced back the winter.

I would love to take credit for these passages, but they grew out of the passions and needs of the characters moment by moment.  Many have said this book has a life of its own, and I’ve just helped set it free. I may have been wandering the woods around my mountain cabin, observing and gathering thoughts; but once the world of any one book has formed around me, I am never alone, and what I write seems a shared effort.

Alone, I can only write the first draft. After that, the characters take the reins from me, and carry each tale to places I could never have imagined on my own.

One of my basic rules of writing is that I must surprise myself, or I could never surprise the reader. When these characters come fully alive, in all their psychological layers, they are just full of surprises.

 Your novel begins with Denis as a child. I enjoyed the way you blended the fantasy play life of this boy with the stirring of past life recall. Did this come naturally to you or did you research children who exhibited past life recall?

 I have researched reincarnation and what lies beyond. I am quite sure, since before my own birth. I’ve had ancient memories both under hypnosis, and spontaneously. In The Mourning After, there are scenes where a young couple recalls Native American village life from another time. These were based on recurrent memories I enjoyed from as far back into my childhood as I can remember.

Mountain Flower, photo by Rennett Stowe, USA

Mountain Flower, photo by Rennett Stowe, USA

I know we share a background in Theosophy. There are many aspects of the story which resonate with those ideas. What other ideas or influences helped you to create The Mourning After?

Students of theosophy may recognize certain moments, like when a ghost writes a message to a friend in trouble, and the words seem to bloom inside the paper, rather than being written on the surface (as with certain Mahatma Letters).

There’s another scene where a deceased character gathers a tiny seed of heaven and memory before being pulled back into the world of the living. This is how I see the concept of the Sutratma.

But beyond theosophy, and my own life, I think there have been unseen influences. Sensitive friends have told me that when I read passages of this to theosophical groups, unseen beings, spiritual teachers, gather around and listen in. Sometimes they nod, as though they had tried to influence or inspire me as I’d been writing it, and I may have gotten some of it right.

 

Theosophical Society Seal

Theosophical Society Seal

 

Can you tell us what you’re currently working on? Is a new novel in the works? 

Until The Mourning After was actually published, I had no idea how profoundly it would affect the lives of so many. For example, I had no idea how many mothers out there have had their children tell them things like, “Remember when we lived on the farm, and you were my sister?” It doesn’t make the news, or even common small talk among friends, but there is apparently a lot of that out there.

When Dora Kunz first became president of the American Theosophical Society, she asked me to join her at headquarters, which I did for over a year. She and another beloved friend and mentor, John Coats, used to say Theosophy was mainly being presented to eggheads, that someone needed to breathe some life and youthful energy into it.

Now I’ve seen the wonderful reaction of everyday folks living ordinary lives, but loving my mystical little story. There seems to be a real need for presenting ancient truths to normal people in entertaining, easily assimilated ways. Single moms raising kids. Families and individuals dealing with AIDS, cancer, poverty, alcoholism… If these ancient truths are real for any of us, they must touch the lives of all of us.

So I want to continue offering messages of hope and theosophical principles through magical and entertaining stories. To these ends I am currently writing a book called “The Gardens of Ailana,” through which readers may learn how to heal and be healed. It will be based on my time studying Therapeutic Touch with Dora in private lessons after hours in the occult library at Olcott, with Dee Krieger, and the folks at Pumpkin Hollow Farm, and the New York T. S.

I am gathering ideas for another book so far titled, “Facebook Mystic.” It will be about people feeling isolated in their own lives, but who touch and bond through the internet. They find themselves guided more and more through undeniable synchronicity and developing awareness that could only come from some Higher, knowing, intentional force.

My life has been a strange one. Living with ghosts, healers, psychics, and mystics. Traveling out-of-body to the hospital rooms of those in need. Camping in deserts and living on cruise ships. Massaging celebrities and suffering poverty. Working myself up from suicidal depression to a life of joy and fulfilment. I have roughed this story out in a book called, “Entertaining Naked People,” but have stuck this on the back burner for now as I develop the others.

I’ve also written a political thriller, “The Soul of Hatred,” which will also have to sit on a shelf for a while. In this one, we show a dystopian future under a totalitarian government. The mega-rich have taken over everything, even re-writing The Bible to suit their agenda. America is lost to Dickensian poverty and ignorance as their mouthpiece “news” network encourages violence and racism, hoping to bring on Armageddon.

When they do, though, and God fires his first warning shots across the bow of humanity, the fascists find out they are on the wrong side.

 For more information on Edward Fahey’s work, please visit his sites.

 Website: http://bobedwardfahey.com/the-mourning-after/ 

Amazon Book Link: http://www.amazon.com/Mourning-After-Edward-Fahey/dp/1484157427/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1386184086&sr=1-1&keywords=the+mourning+after+edward+fahey

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robert.fahey.16?ref=tn_tnmn

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PHILIP K DICK: MYSTIC

Philip K. Dick Portrait by Pete Welsch Washington, DC

Philip K. Dick
Portrait by Pete Welsch
Washington, DC

Most people know Philip K. Dick (PKD) by way of two main venues- either his science fiction novels or his movies (Minority Report, Blade Runner, etc). If fact, he is more famous now then he ever was in life. Such is the nature of being a visionary- the art world is rife with this. The thing I find fascinating about PKD though, is something most people have never heard about. PKD had many mystical experiences and he wrote about them.

His first encounter happened in Feb. 1974 and what followed would direct a line of inquiry for the rest of his life. After oral surgery and under the influence of sodium pentothal, he opened his door to a delivery girl who was wearing a gold necklace with a pendant in the shape of a fish- an early Christian symbol. The sun glinted off the fish producing a pink beam. The resulting mystical experience involved an encounter with an intelligence which allowed PKD to receive wisdom and clairvoyant messages. Throughout Feb. and Mar., the experiences continued with visions and more encounters. At one point while in trance, PKD received detailed medical information about his son and a life-threatening condition. Rushing the baby to the hospital, doctors indeed confirmed the condition and saved the boy.

exegesis

In the years of exploration and searching that followed, PKD kept detailed journals, totaling some 9000 pages. Whittled down to 900 pages, Exegesis is a collection of his mystical experiences and the author’s attempts to make sense of what was happening to him. It makes for fascinating reading. There is real passion and honesty in his efforts to understand and deal with what was going on. On one hand, it’s very inspiring but on the other, it’s unsatisfying too. PKD never really accepts any one answer and scholars who view the material are also at a loss. What really happened to PKD during the period known as 2-3-74 (and after) and what did it mean?

PKD’s last novel was entitled The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. It is considered to be one of his best, and truly, it is a metaphysical work. Reading Exegesis and then Transmigration, the reader is encouraged to search for their own answers and fully engage the mind. Happy reading!

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THE CHAKRAS AND SPIRITUAL GROWTH

Chakras

I recently finished reading In Search of the Miraculous- Healing Into Consciousness by Eliza Mada Dalian. It’s a book for spiritual seekers wanting a manual on the path out of fear, pain, and suffering. This is a largely down to earth book that attempts to simplify the mystical and make it accessible to the average reader. It is not St. Theresa of Avila, The Cloud of Unknowing, a Buddhist sutra, or a Sufi text. Dalian grounds her work and for that we can be thankful.

The one section I found to be particularly useful was the part concerning the development of the ego-mind in each of the chakras. Chakras can be thought of as circular energy centers, and for our purposes, we will use the traditional Indian system of seven chakras. Dalian is careful to point out that spiritual development through the chakras is not necessarily a linear one. I take that to mean that life’s trials and tribulations can have us working in any chakra at any time or in several (which seems likely given the complexity of life). Let’s take a look at the spiritual work associated with each chakra and see if you can identify where you are in the process.

Healing Into Consciousness

1st Chakra (Root): Foundations of Life: (located at the base of the spine)
Although some writings on chakras are different, Dalian identifies this chakra as the center for sexuality. The spiritual work here involves breaking through sexual fears, taboos, and conditioning.

2nd Chakra (Hara): Survival of the Physical Body: (located 2” below navel)
Here the spiritual seeker deals with fears or insecurities over your physical survival. Eventually you develop trust that the universe will take care of you.

3rd Chakra (Solar Plexus): Developing Self Power & Decision Making Ability: (located in solar plexus region)
Spiritual work here involves developing the courage to make decisions, set boundaries for protection, and accept the responsibility for one’s actions. Considerable maturing of the ego-mind happens here.

4th Chakra (Heart): Developing Unconditional Love: (located behind the sternum near the heart)
The heart chakra is the bridge between the lower instinctual chakras and the higher spiritual chakras. Dalian believes that 90 percent of humanity is stuck in the first three chakras and I’d tend to agree. The work of the spirit in the 4th chakra is to transform the body’s need for survival and the instinctual lust of self- gratification into unconditional love.

5th Chakra (Throat): Developing Individuality & Self Expression: (located at the base of the throat near the thyroid) The spiritual challenge here is to develop honesty and integrity that allows an individual to break free of old patterns, beliefs, and social conditioning to bring freedom of expression and individuality into the world. There is a turn inward for truth and compromising the soul is no longer possible. People begin to speak and live their purpose.

6th Chakra (Third Eye): Developing Wisdom & Intelligence: (located in the center of the forehead between the eyebrows)
Spiritual growth in the 6th chakra is associated with the revelation and expansion of psychic knowing. Sometimes called the opening of the third eye, the door to cosmic reality opens. An individual begins to develop extra-sensory abilities, intuition, and begins to glimpse who he/she really is in cosmic terms. Interconnectedness becomes apparent.

7th Chakra (Crown): Dissolving the Ego: (located at the top of the head, acts as the transition point between physical reality and cosmic reality)
This is what Buddhists call Enlightenment. It’s the ultimate goal, the end game. Here, spiritual work involves the death of the ego-mind and ultimate liberation. Through the 7th chakra, the life force moves from time/space reality into timeless reality of ever-evolving consciousness. It’s important to remember that enlightenment (or liberation) is available at every moment of life or at the point of physical death.

If you’d like to learn more about any of the specific challenges associated with the chakras or techniques and meditations that may be useful, grab a copy of the book. There is a whole chapter packed with resources to help. You can also visit the author’s website at www.madadalian.com.

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FUN WITH NEW WORDS

The origin of English words.

The origin of English words.

I just want to remind all my tweeps to refrain from photobombing me unless you want my ripped OH to set a micropig lose on you during one of your date nights.

It sounds ridiculous, and it is, but how many of you recognized six new additions to the online Oxford Dictionary? After all, language is an evolving art form and 2013 saw some interesting additions to the grand old tome. Usually by the time slang is incorporated into something as old and wise as the dictionary, many of us are already using the words or have heard them in some context. Old and wise as the dictionary? Dictionaries have been around forever, right? Not so fast.

The Oxford English Dictionary really isn’t as ancient and definitive (yes- a pun!!) as you might think. It wasn’t until 1857 that the Philological Society of London got together and started to think about putting together a dictionary of the English Language. After five years of hard work, the authors had reached the word “ant” and realized the project was going to take much longer than the planned ten years. Published in multiple volumes, The Oxford English Dictionary (affectionately known as the “OED”), was finally completed in 1928. If you want to read more about this Herculean task, Simon Winchester’s book, The Professor and The Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the OED is a great read.

51OED

Language is all about communication and for us to understand each other in the ever evolving reality of today’s world, we have to keep up with the ways in which science, technology, entertainment, and social media change things. These are the areas that probably contribute most of the new words. Gone are the days when writers like Shakespeare created his own words and Lewis Carroll coined vorpal, chortle, galumph, and burble. But maybe not. New words are added every year and they have to come from somewhere. Maybe you will come up with the next slick phrase for something. In the meantime, let’s take a look at a few of the new entries for 2013.

OED Online Additions:

tweeps- (n.) your followers on Twitter

photobomb-(v.) to ruin a photograph by suddenly appearing in the camera’s field of view

as the photo is taken, usually as a prank or joke

OH- (n.) a person’s wife, husband, or partner (“Other Half”, I suppose)

Micropig- (n.) a very small pig usually kept as a pet (I’ve written a book about micro-

elephants as pets and, I firmly believe with this OED addition, it’s time for the book to

be published!!)

ripped-(adj) muscular body

date night & group hug- also made it in

Merriam Webster Additions:

flexitarian- (n.) someone whose meatless diet occasionally contains meat/fish

sexting- (v.) the sending of explicit messages or photos by cellphone

Other catchy additions: game changer, brain cramp, f-bomb, bucket list, aha moment, man cave, energy drink, cloud computing, craft beer  

I’m off to look up cloud computing!

 

 

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THE UNEXPLAINED POWERS OF ANIMALS

LUKE

LUKE

In the last two weeks, my husband and I have welcomed a new dog into the family. Luke is a friendly, almost two year old, Golden Retriever who has had a rough start in life. As we are getting to know each other, I’m drawn back into the routine and wonder of dog ownership. All the while, our elderly cat, George, raises an eyebrow and wonders why he can’t live in a one cat household.

 

George

George

I’ve been re-reading and thoroughly enjoying Dogs That Know When Their Owners Are Coming Home (And Other Unexplained Powers of Animals) by Rupert Sheldrake. Sheldrake is a biologist with a Ph.D. from Cambridge. As a pet owner himself he wondered why the stories of pet owners were so universally ignored by scientists. He felt that confining research to lab animals or wildlife observation misses entirely to capture a unique understanding man has with his companion animals. Sheldrake set out to mine this field for its gold. He interviewed hundreds of people with experience with our closest companion animals. These included dog trainers, vets, zoo keepers, kennel owners, and pet owners. Later, he conducted formal surveys in Britain and the US to quantify the frequency of the most commonly reported behaviors in the area of perceptiveness. He took a special interest in reports of dogs that seemed to know when their owners were coming home. These dogs displayed anticipatory behavior which included alertness and going to a particular spot to await their owner’s return. Using a scientific approach, Sheldrake set out to learn what was at work in this commonly reported behavior.

He examined the common explanations many have given for this behavior. An established routine by the owner, a dog’s superior sense of smell, a dog’s keen hearing ability, human cueing, and the use of a familiar mode of transportation did not seem likely. When these things were eliminated, case histories suggested a human/animal bond along the lines of telepathy.

sheldrake

The best way to understand this is to look at the case of Jaytee and owner Pam Smart. Pam often left Jaytee with her parents when she went out and over time, the parents noticed Jaytee would go to a window and wait for Pam to return. Often the parents had no idea when Pam would return but started to trust Jaytee’s signal because Pam did show up shortly after the dog would go to the window. The Smarts kept logs of the incidents and before long an opportunity arose to film what was really going on. A camera was set up to watch Jaytee and a film crew followed as Pam was sent out. At a randomly selected time Pam was told to return home. On split screen and with the times synchronized, the film shows Pam being told it’s time to return while Jaytee reacts at the same moment with alertness and ears pricked. While Pam walks to a taxi stand, Jaytee goes to a window to wait. Jaytee seems to be responding to Pam’s intention to return suggesting a mind to mind connection. Telepathy! Further research carried out in 1995 and 1996, confirmed that Jaytee anticipated Pam’s arrival at randomly chosen times and in unfamiliar vehicles. Psychic debunker, Dr. Richard Wiseman, conducted his own experiment and found the same result.

Work with filming several other dogs indicated that Jaytee is not alone in her ability. Surveys indicate that the behavior is widespread in all kinds of dogs. About 51% of dogs seem to do this. Males display the behavior slightly more than females. A close bond with a human does seem to be necessary to induce the dog to engage in the behavior. Sheldrake advances the idea of morphic fields to explain the mind to mind connection we have with our pets. This invisible connection is likened to a rubber that can stretch over large distances to facilitate communication.

Sheldrake’s book is a delight. There are many stories of dogs, cats, parrots, horses and other animals engaging in behaviors because they are so connected to us. In later chapters, animal empathy, telepathy, precognition, and sense of direction are covered. I invite you to explore this fascinating book and rediscover your pet through the eyes of science. And don’t forget to share your stories here. I spent a lot of time on dogs, but how many of you have cats who know when there is a vet appointment? Mine does and not because the cat carrier is left out.

Watch the videos:

Unexplained Power of Animals http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLgyFQZxs40

Science Deluded       http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kO4-9l8IWFQ

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WHEN DEE MET KELLEY

John Dee Portrait- Ashmolean Museum

John Dee Portrait- Ashmolean Museum

February, 1582

Mortlake

Light flooded through the west window illuminating the simple study. The doors were closed against the noise of his toddler children. Within was sanctuary. Some especially interesting manuscripts had been hidden in a traveling bag secreted inside the chimney. The comings and goings at Mortlake had drawn many rumors which John Dee had carefully tried to sidestep. Owning one of the best libraries in Europe drew many scholarly types. Dee’s interests included math, astronomy, astrology, navigation, and the occult. He had access to the powerful ministers of Queen Elizabeth I’s court as well as to the Queen herself. Dee’s interests were not unique because many at court dabbled, but Dee hated the caricatured image created by the term “arch conjuror” he had been given in some circles.

Dee called his work optical science and for him crystal gazing was just another way of discovering how the universe worked much like using a telescope to understand the motion of the stars. But Dee had a problem. Not having the power to scry himself, he had to rely on others to do the gazing for him. Previously he had worked with Barnabas Saul but Saul had disappeared a few days earlier. Now a man named Talbot (later known as Edward Kelley) had appeared on his doorstep claiming to be able to do what Saul had done.

Dee’s expectations were modest but using a crystal ball, Talbot soon had a vision of the archangel Uriel. Unable to resist access to such a highly placed spirit, Dee asked about a coded manuscript he possessed. Uriel told him that The Book of Soyga (a copy resides in the British Library) was revealed to Adam in paradise and could only be understood with the help of Archangel Michael. In a later session, Uriel told Dee to construct a table to facilitate future angelic communications.

The table was to be set into four divine wax seals and each seal had to contain an image revealed by the angel. On the top of the table, resting on the Seal of God, a crystal ball or shew stone would be placed.

Objects belonging to Dee at the British Museum (photo: British Museum)

Objects belonging to Dee at the British Museum (photo: British Museum)

 

Later in the week, Talbot had a vision of the Archangel Michael anointing Dee. There was no doubt in Dee’s mind that some very special work lay ahead of the two men. Over the next decade Dee and Kelley would receive and communicate in Enochian, a fully developed angelic language. People still puzzle over those messages and their importance.

For more investigation:

John Dee’s Conversations with Angels- Deborah E. Harkness

The Queen’s Conjuror- Benjamin Woolley

John Dee’s Five Books of Mystery- Original Sourcebook of Enochian

Magic- Joseph H. Peterson

The Complete Enochian Dictionary- Donald C. Laylock

Enochian Alphabet- Vincent Bridges (YouTube- video, the importance of Dee’s

communication )

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THE LINE BETWEEN FACT & FICTION

tantra

Since the release of INTO THE LAND OF SNOWS, there have been some questions concerning what’s real and not real in the book. From the perspective of this being a book whose main theme concerns defining that very line, it’s a somewhat amusing question. I concern myself with it because I’ve heard some people dismiss the book as fantasy. But that’s not the whole story.

The book is set in the magical Himalayas surrounded by a rich cultural tradition. In such a place, my job as author was relatively easy. I chose concepts and ideas already present there to create a story around an American teenager. I made up very little.

Now as to the facts.

1. Locations- The map at the beginning of the book accurately depicts the placement of real locations Blake would visit along his route, had Blake actually gone there. But the careful reader will notice that about half way through the book, Blake continues his journey, but the map stops. This is because Blake has left the material reality of our world. An alternate reality opens up for him to fully experience the magic and potential for enlightenment.

2. Mallory& Irvine- The story of these climbers disappearing into legend while on the Third Step is true. The camera Mallory carried that day is still missing. We don’t know (for sure) who summited Everest first, although Hillary is officially credited with it.

3. Yetis- These animals/beings remain a mystery. Sherpa culture recognizes different kinds of yetis. I took great liberty with the Tantric yidam concept.

4. Baian-Kara-Ula Mountains- There are legends of star people and an origination story. As late as the 1950s, stories of the Chinese gathering evidence in the region exist.

5. Chakra points- There are many different systems. Tibetans usually depict 5 while Indian schools generally have 7. Research by Dr. Hiroshi Motoyama revealed the heart chakra produced measurable physical light.

6. Singing Bowls- Are used for healing.

7. Lung-gom-pa/Tumo/Yidam- Are Tantric practices.

8. Birds- The sneaky placement of rare birds in the region was my invention and homage to HH. The 16th Karmapa, who loved birds.

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Filed under Books, Spiritual/Mysticism, Story behind ITLS

A BEATRIX POTTER CHRISTMAS

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The Christmas tree is up and as I peruse ornaments collected over decades, I’m struck by how many of them are animals. There are cats and dogs, rabbits and squirrels, hedgehogs and birds (a humming bird, blue jay, goose, partridge), and cows and horses. At the back door, I struggle with getting sunflower seeds and nuts out for my squirrels. Three inches of snow have to be cleared before I can lay down six piles of seed to accommodate the squirrels. After our dog died, we started feeding birds off our deck but soon found the squirrels to be more entertaining. The birds still come to the feeder and the overflow trickles down to feed a family of field mice who will come onto the deck once the squirrels have had their fill. I won’t see the bunny today because the storm is intensifying but I take comfort that I’ll see him tomorrow once the snow melts off. He was here earlier though; because I see his tracks crisscross the yard. The ornaments on the Christmas tree and the activity in the backyard scream BEATRIX POTTER. I live in a world she knew.

Beatrix Potter

Helen Beatrix Potter was born in 1866 in London. She is best remembered for her children’s stories featuring animals. As children, she and her brother spent many happy family vacations in Scotland and the English Lake District. Undoubtedly, the freedom to explore and interact with nature as a child grounded Beatrix in the natural world and fostered her connection to the land and its creatures. She and her brother made pets of wildlife including rabbits, a hedgehog, mice, and bats. Beatrix’s talents in drawing and painting emerged in childhood and were encouraged by her parents. In her teens, she wandered the Lake District sketching and immersing herself in nature. She took a keen interest in archeology, geology, entomology, and mycology. By the late 1890s, she had become adept at scientific illustration concentrating on watercolors of local fungi. She even had a paper on fungi reproduction presented at the Royal Botanic Gardens (women were not allowed to attend).

Peter

It wasn’t until her mid- 30s that Beatrix took a set of picture letters she had written to children and turned them into her first book. She had The Tale of Peter Rabbit printed in 1901. Publishers turned down the opportunity to publish the book failing to see its merit (think Harry Potter in the Edwardian Age,  JK Rowling was also turned down by multiple publishers). Along came Frederick Warner who published The Tale of Peter Rabbit with color illustrations the following year. Beatrix’s book was highly successful and so were the two (The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin and The Tailor of Gloucester) that came soon after. From then on, Beatrix published two or three books a year. Later her interests in farming and preserving the Lake District became foremost in her life, but she is still remembered fondly for the animal characters and stories she created.

www.beatrixpottersociety.org.uk

http://www.peterrabbit.com

Miss Potter (2006), the movie with Renee Zellweger & Ewan McGregor

 

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Filed under animals, Book Review, Books

ON HABITS

habit

We all have habits. Some are good and some are not so good, but it’s amazing to consider how much of our lives are given over to them. We get up in the morning and activate those circuits and we’re off. If you doubt how much habits rule you, just try to change something. Do your morning routine or just a couple of things out-of-order and see how discombobulated you become. What’s that saying? We are creatures of habit.

In The Power of Habit, New York Times reporter, Charles Duhigg, discusses why habits exist and how they can be changed. The power to transform habits allows individuals, organizations, and societies to implement changes.     

In part one of the book, we learn about the habits of the individual. The author delves into the neuroscience of the habit loop and how cravings are created. The real insight here is that habits are not broken, rather they are transformed. The stimulus (or cue) for a habit, along with some kind of payoff will always remain. The individual however can modify the response to the cue and substitute a new behavior. This creates the “new” habit. Be warned, this is not a magic bullet. Changing habits still remains hard work.

The habits of successful organizations are covered in part two. Here we learn how keystone habits are fundamental to the organization and how changing these can have powerful ripple effects. Alcoa, Starbucks, and Target are examined in detail but take care. Not everything about habit change is positive. While Alcoa’s focus on employee safety is to be applauded, Target’s computer marketing data collection may set your teeth on edge. Don’t worry about Big Brother, worry about how you and your purchase information is being exploited.

Part three concerns itself with the habits of societies. The success of Saddleback Church and the Montgomery bus boycott are used as examples of how societal rules and pressures can be brought to bear to affect change. The author concludes with a section called the neurology of free will. This is a last foray into recent discoveries about neuroscience and asks the reader to consider the cases of a murderer and a gambler. Both have habitual behaviors but are treated very differently under the law. It’s a rather odd ending for the book and I wonder if the dichotomy the author was aiming for might better have been used as an introduction to the subject rather than a stomach punch at the end.

The book wasn’t exactly what I thought it would be. It is not a self-help book and no one will be really motivated to implement change by it. It does make you feel change is possible. There are some good discussions about brain science and recent discoveries. However, much of the book is episodic and anecdotal. I wouldn’t use it in a business management setting, so I guess it’s sort of a general interest introduction.

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Filed under Book Review, Books